Insight into the Mind of a Depressed Person

I posted a couple of months ago on The Last Psychiatrist’s post on suicide, which is still being hotly debated, and to be honest, is rather depressing. I gather that the majority of people commenting on the post have a general agreement that life has no purpose and as one commenter said, "just *is*." If there are people who think differently, I wish they’d leave comments. It appears that most people seem to think that life is rather wasteful.

A commenter named Jack posted his controversial thoughts. His entire post echoes what I’ve thought in the past (and currently struggle with) and what I’m sure others who attempted or committed suicide have thought too.

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The Last Psychiatrist—and my thoughts—on suicide

"Your life is a publicly traded company.  You may have majority ownership, but you still are subject to a Board and to your shareholders.  If you want to kill yourself, everyone you have touched in any way gets to vote.  Good luck."

I stumbled upon this post from The Last Psychiatrist written about a month ago. Alone basically argues that suicidal people shouldn’t kill themselves because they have a responsibility—a duty—to stay alive for others. The comments mostly lean toward people having the free will to kill themselves should they choose to do so. Here’s an excerpt from one of the comments:

"You have a responsibility to improve the lives of those around you." Excuse me?! When did THAT become part of the constitution? NOBODY has the responsibility or even the capability to improve anyone else’s life! Hell, you’re a Doctor and you don’t take responsibility for improving anyone’s life!

I’ve noticed that suicide is the taboo mental health topic even among the mentally ill. I’m going to go on a brief narcissist trip and mention that I received few comments on my last suicidal post. To be honest, I figured more people would have chided me for my distorted thinking. Makes me wonder to be quite honest. If I decided that I was going to commit suicide (which I’m not right now), would you support my decision or would you make a case for me to stay alive? What would you say?

Can I be even more narcissist and hope that I get at least 5 comments on this post? Thanks in advance.

Current mood rating: 6

The New Little Button

UPDATE: Please donate to Furious Seasons first. I reread his blog thoroughly today and it really struck me that if he didn’t make enough during his fund-raiser, he was going to scale back writing on the site.  He’s one of the main reasons that this blog continues to go on. He certainly inspires me and I know he’s an inspiration to a lot of bloggers as well. I think his fund-raising season is over but I know he’d still appreciate anything he gets. Heck, I’m going to dig up some pennies myself and throw them his way. But if you have $1 left over, that’ll do just fine.

I’ve joined the likes of Furious Seasons and The Last Psychiatrist and placed a PayPal donate button on my site. I’m currently unemployed and would like to get at least $12 a month to pay for my use of this site. I might mention the little button every now and then but there’s no pressure to donate really. But if you like my blog enough and have a dollar or so that you’d like to spare, please feel free. Google AdSense didn’t work out for me because of "invalid clicks" so I’ll have to look to other forms of ad revenue to keep me going. (Others have had trouble with it too.) I signed up with Typepad’s links a while ago but nothing ever came of that. I’ll try it again and see if I have better luck with it this time around. Otherwise, I hope  $12  per month isn’t too steep of a cost. Thanks in advance for any pennies that are thrown my way.

I don't have a cold; I am a cold

I’ve been wanting to comment on this for a while, and The Last Psychiatrist reminded me about it:

(NB: "the patient has bipolar," not "the patient is bipolar.")

Precisely. Who goes around linking their illness to who they are? It sounds ridiculous to say, "I am cancer" or "I am diabetes." People have depression; they struggle with bipolar disorder; they suffer from anemia.

I suppose I understand the mistake. (Grammar lesson, folks.) When people refer to themselves as bipolar, it’s being used as a predicate adjective. Americans do this commonly in the English language: "I am ill" as opposed to "I have an illness." Or perhaps, "I am anemic" instead of "I have anemia." It’d be confusing, however, for a person to declare, "I am cold" instead of "I have a cold."

So what’s today’s lesson, kids? Tell people that you have an illness as opposed to saying that you are an illness. Your personality will be less inclined to take a beating.

Credit goes to my husband for reminding me that a linking verb is followed by a predicate adjective. (I initially got the adjective part.) So much for me and my English degree.