Loose Screws Mental Health News Rises From the Ashes

It’s good to be back.


A study for the U of Vermont concludes that anorexics have the highest rates of suicide. Researchers previously thought that their deaths resulted from their emaciated states. The actual article can be read at Time.com.

Anorexia has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. But psychologists previously believed that those high rates of death were due to patients’ already deteriorated physical state. The hypothesis was that these are people already on the verge of death — they were so malnourished and underweight that even the slightest suicide attempt could easily lead to death.

Anorexia is usually seen as an illness rather than a psychiatric disorder. It’s good to see Time shedding some light on the link between anorexia and suicide. Making this kind of information widespread will definitely save  some lives that otherwise would have been lost.


On the topic of suicides, an 18-year-old high school student in Mobile, Alabama walked into a high school gym and shot himself in front of classmates on Thursday. There’s not much information surrounding this story but it just saddened me to read that a young man, perhaps with a good life ahead of him, took his own life away. While he didn’t shoot his classmates – he fired one shot up at the ceiling before shooting himself, I continue to remain dismayed at the trend of school shootings. No one is ever happy about suicides or homicides of any age but I think there’s something about school shootings that really speaks to adults. We like to think of kids – wow, I’m no longer a kid in comparison to them – as innocent and with a bright future ahead of them. There’s something about a school shooting that strikes a chord within all of us. The idea of school is equated with the notion of learning, growth, and development. It implies that students (for the most part) are not quite adults yet. JaJuan Holmes may have been a legal adult, but it seems that his unresolved issues were still viewed through a minor’s eyes.


laughterSeoul National University Hospital in South Korea is providing sessions on laughing your depression away. Many of the patients – if not all – suffer with depression stemming from their bout with cancer. For Americans and maybe even the British, the concept of laughing depression away seems ridiculous. However in South Korea’s culture, laughter outside of the home is deemed inappropriate, mainly for women.

“It was awkward at first. Yes, smiling is a good thing, but you know, I’m a little conservative. I sometimes still think laughing out loud is a bit low class,” [Jung-Oak Lee] said.

I’ve taken laughter for granted. I don’t know what I’d do if I was looked down upon for laughing out loud in public. That’s the last thing I want to worry about in a social atmosphere.

(Image courtesy Olson Center For Wellness)

Loose Screws Mental Health News

According to a press release (I’m well aware what I’m saying), a recent study possibly shows that schizophrenia’s physical effects are more widespread in the body; researchers previously theorized that schizophrenia was limited to the central nervous system.

“The findings could lead to better diagnostic testing for the disease and could help explain why those afflicted with it are more prone to type II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and other chronic health problems.”

Apparently, those who suffer from schizophrenia have abnormal proteins in the liver and red blood cells. While schizophrenia’s most visible effects are psychological, researchers have noted that schizophrenics are at a higher risk for “chronic diseases.” The genetic and physical implications of such a study could prove interesting, especially for those suffering from and at risk for schizophrenia. Also in schizophrenia news, researchers have noticed an “excessive startle response.” The startle response, known as prepulse inhibition (PPI), is being considered as a biomarker for the illness.

Something Furious Seasons might like to argue if he hasn’t taken the following on:

“Lastly, but quite importantly, atypical antipsychotic were found to be more effective than typical antipsychotics in improving PPI, thus ‘normalizing’ the startle response. This led the authors to note:

‘Because an overwhelming number of patients with schizophrenia are currently treated with atypical APs, it is possible that PPI deficits in this population are a vanishing biomarker.”

What’s the advantage with atypicals vs. typicals? How do they work differently? *sigh* I need a pharmaceutical-specific wikipedia.

Schizophrenia News previously wrote about how proof is lacking in schizophrenia developing in those who have suffered from child abuse. (Excuse me for the awful construction of that sentence.) However, a new study shows that those at a high risk for schizophrenia benefit from having a good relationship with their parents during childhood. Read more.

Editor and Publisher has noted that suicides among Army soldiers doubled in 2005 compared to 2004.

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