The MOTHERS Act: Read it for yourself

Mom and infantI’ve written about the MOTHERS Act in the past but recently there has been much debate swirling around it. There are those actively against it (Amy Philo, Doug Bremner) and those actively for it (Katherine Stone, John Grohol). I’m going to refrain from voicing my personal opinion on the act from here on out since I’m seeing tensions run rather high and I don’t care to have those tensions directed at me.

But I haven’t seen anyone link to the Congressional bill recently so before engaging in debate, I encourage people to read the actual bill for themselves and come to their own conclusions. It’s actually short (unlike our current 1,000-plus-page universal healthcare bill) and a relatively easy (see “understandable”) read.

S. 324 the most recent version I know of. If there’s a more recent version, please comment to let me know.

Blog to check out: Postpartum Dads Project

A blog that I'd recommend, especially for both moms and dads of new children, is Postpartum Dads Project. I think the idea is very cool and long overdue. The goal is to be a resource and place of encouragement and education for fathers who have wives going through postpartum depression or are experiencing depression themselves. As the tagline says, "Because PPD is a WHOLE family thing." Katherine Stone over at Postpartum Progress has a small write-up about it.

Loose Screws Mental Health News

I haven’t done this for a while so hopefully I can pick this up again a little more regularly. (crosses fingers)


Read a heart-wrenching story in the UK Daily Mail about a mother whose postpartum depression led her to begin slitting her wrists.

Tom ChaplinTom Chaplin, singer for the band Keane, has admitted to contemplating suicide.

Tom – who was taking up to two grams of cocaine a day – revealed to Britain’s Q Magazine: “I was at the end of my tether in Japan. I was tired of my life and feeling pretty suicidal. I got off the plane and called my dad. I’d told him that I’d left the band and that I was falling apart. I checked myself into The Priory.”

Chaplin’s interesting view:

Despite his own drugs hell, Tom says it’s a personal decision to experiment with substances. He claims troubled rock star Pete Doherty should be left to take all the drugs he wants.

Tom said: “No-one’s got any right to stop him killing himself.”

An article in the Chicago Tribune on how VNS is beginning to show benefits for some patients. Which reminds me, browse on over to VNSdepression.com to learn more.

Nicholas Vakkur must have read the Treatment Advocacy Center’s post on how the CATIE study shows an increase in violent offenses by mentally ill patients (namely those with psychosis and schizophrenia). He refutes this idea on dissidentvoice.org:

Individuals with a mental illness are far more likely to be the victims, rather than the perpetrators of violence, while the vast majority of people who commit acts of violence against others are not in fact mentally ill.

This rush to stereotype individuals suffering from psychiatric illness as likely murderers is reckless and lacks credulity. Mental illness has no role in the majority of violent crimes committed in our society. Alcohol and substance abuse far outweigh mental illness as factors contributing to violence, while the strongest predictor of violent and/or criminal behavior is a past history of violence and criminality, not a major mental illness.

Loose Screws Mental Health News

National Mental Health Anti-Stigma

The U.S. Health Department and Ad Council are now launching ads to target mental illness stigmas. The article uses a really lame example (and unrealistic) of two young men playing a video game and one of them admits to a mental illness. And the friend is oh-so supportive. (Yeah, right.) I know it’s supposed to remove the stigma and make people more compassionate but the fact of the matter is that the ads will probably be unrealistic. A better campaign would be to have a woman at work WORKING and to have a voiceover that explains that you’d never know this woman hears voices, that she’s schizophrenic. Cut to the woman smiling and interacting with others. Voiceover again – but she’s on medication and is receiving counseling. “What would YOU do if this woman told you she had a mental illness?” Obviously, we’d have to resort to the unfortunate aspect of making the woman unbelievably attractive so all the guys could go, “No way! Not that hot chick!” and all the women could say, “No way! She’s too pretty!” Or vice versa for a successful, handsome-looking young man. You get the idea. The article adds at the very end that the Ad Council will launch a suicide prevention campaign this summer, which will be sponsored by SAMHSA.

UPDATE: The (cheesy) videos are up at http://www.whatadifference.org. You can see a spot ad and determine what to do about the situation the people face. (Be forewarned: Choosing the negative option gets you a lecture.)

First-time moms are at risk for developing mental illness like schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder within the first three months of delivering a child, according to an ABCNews article. And it also delivers another shocker: postpartum depression is severely underdiagnosed. Well, well, well, well…

In really sad news, the suicide rate among NY’s ethnic women is at high risk. Young Hispanic women and elderly Asian women are cited as the highest minorities in NY who commit suicide. The article via India eNews.com says the reasons for this is because of “cultural and linguistic isolation, the stress of immigration and a shortage of psychiatric and counselling (sic) services.” Perhaps the saddest part of this is that “women who are not proficient in English do not get help ‘until symptoms reach crisis proportions.'” This article highlights the ever-increasing need to make psychiatric and counseling services available in other languages, especially Spanish, considering the boom of the Hispanic population (which , yes, includes illegal immigrants).