Nutrition, Part 1

Two posts from Jazz In Pieces have me wondering about my sugar consumption. Here’s the problem:

I don’t consume sugar.

SplendaWell, I do but not in drinks really. I’m addicted to Splenda.

I’m attracted to Splenda because of all the purported benefits:

  • accepted by several national and international food safety regulatory bodies
  • the only artificial sweetener ranked as “safe” by the consumer advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest.
  • one can consume 15 mg/kg/day … “on a daily basis over a … lifetime without any adverse effects”.
  • usually contains 95% dextrose, which the body readily metabolizes.
  • safe to ingest as a diabetic sugar substitute

But it’s still considered an artificial sweetener, which means that it’s not “natural” or “unrefined.”

Is unrefined sugar really better? I’m not sure. My mother uses brown sugar because “it’s healthier for you” but after doing a bit of reading, brown sugar can be refined as well. But “natural brown sugar” exists and I wonder if my mother is on to something.

The reason I’m so concerned about refined sugar and artificial sweeteners doesn’t really have so much to do with my mental health as it does to do with my weight. But depending on my weight (namely gain), it affects my mental health so I suppose the two go hand-in-hand.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tips for proper self-withdrawal from medication(s)

Gianna, a reader of this site, has a great and informative blog, Bipolar Blast. In a recent post, she gives some tips for proper psych drug withdrawal. This is particularly helpful for those dealing with severe antidepressant withdrawal effects. For me, Effexor comes to mind. I also think about "Honey’s" experience with Zoloft. Not only does Gianna emphasize diet and nutrition as an important part of the process, but she also delves into proper titration. (Many people think that the diet and nutrition thing is obvious, but many people overlook that important piece of recovery.)

I understand that many people – especially in the psych world – think Peter Breggin’s a wack job, but he can have some good points. Gianna refers to Breggin’s 10% rule:

"Breggin suggests what has come to be known the 10% rule. Any given drug should not be reduced anymore than 10% at a time. Once a taper is complete the next taper should not exceed 10% of the new dose. Therefore, the milligram, then fraction of milligram amount decreases with each new taper. I’ve found that I have to sometimes go in even smaller amounts. As low as 5% and sometimes people go as small as 2.5%–for people on benzodiazepines it is not unusual to go in even smaller amounts. Cutting pills is not always enough. Sometimes liquid titration is necessary. This may involve dissolving the smallest dose pill in water, club soda or even alcohol, which can then be diluted with water, then using a syringe to cut down milliliters at a time. Medications also sometimes come in liquid form and can be gotten by prescription. It should be noted that some medications should not be dissolved. Especially time released medications. This would be extremely dangerous."

Gianna clearly knows what she’s talking about. Head on over to her site to read the rest of the post.

Alternative remedies

alternative remediesAustralian researchers are reporting what we’ve already heard before: diet and nutrition can help with depression. BIG NEWS! [sarcasm]

A number of nutrients, including polyunsaturated fatty acids, St. John’s Wort and several B vitamins, have the potential to influence mood by increasing the absorption of chemical messengers in the brain, Dr. Dianne Volker of the University of Sydney in Chippendale and Jade Ng of Goodman Fielder Commercian in North Ryde, New South Wales note in the journal Nutrition and Dietetics.

Volker and Ng go on to say that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid helps prevent depression. Sucks for me considering that I don’t like fish at all. Tryptophan, an amino acid found most commonly in turkey, is also suggested as an aid against depression. Once digested, tryptophan is converted into serotonin, which also may help fight depression. (Hooray for Thanksgiving!)

In a random stumble upon a new blog, I came across an article titled, “Natural Remedies for Depression.” The raging debate continues, of course. Nothing’s been completely proven in favor of anything. In addition to some of the items mentioned above, this article adds a few alternative remedies for depression: