Generic drugs are not exactly like brand names

Gianna at Bipolar Blast stumbled upon an article at the LA Times that outlines the FDA’s standard for generics:

In almost all cases, the FDA permits a generic drug to release 80% to
125% of an active ingredient into the bloodstream, compared to that
released in a single dose of the original medication.

Gianna makes a good point for tapering down on brand-name meds then switching to generics:

And definately too broad when I’ve been cutting down my only 10% at a
time. If the drug is 80% of what I’m taking that is a 20% cut without
intending a reduction. It of course can work the other way and make
coming off the drug a longer task and more difficult if it’s actually
125% of the brand name.

eek – that’s something to think about.

Today's lesson: Paxil and Lexapro are not great antidepressants

Dawdy at Furious Seasons wrote a post on an editorial in the LA Times by Summer Beretsky’s experience with Paxil. After reading her editorial, I’m reminded that my own experience with one antidepressant wasn’t all that unique. Her drug was Paxil for panic attacks; mine was Lexapro for depression following a 3-month (on-and-off) stint with Paxil. I’m struck by the similarity of our experiences; not only did the same thing happened to me but I was also a communications major in college as well.

Paxil had one pretty undesirable effect on me: I started to lose interest in just about everything. I stopped initiating social activities (who needs that sort of thing?) and was no longer motivated to perform well academically.

My emotions had flat-lined: I hadn’t cried in months, nor had I proverbially jumped for joy. I felt — nothing.

I can still remember sleeping in bed at home on a weekday when I should have been at class. It was 2 in the afternoon, around the time my copy editing class was to begin. My boyfriend at the time (now my husband) lived in Kentucky while I attended college in New York. He planned to visit me that weekend but was getting fed up with my depression and listlessness. He called from work to tell me to get up and go to class. I mumbled on the phone, half-confused, and said no. He demanded, “Why not?” I said quite plainly, “Because I don’t care.” He said, “If you don’t get up and go to class, I won’t visit you this weekend.”

I replied, “I don’t care.”

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