"Being bipolar"

Here’s a comment that stuck out to me recently that I wanted to highlight:

I think a lot of us feel like our disorder defines us and who we are. Often times, I feel this way. When I meet new people (which is a difficult thing in itself), I can always tell a difference in how they treat me once they learn that I’m bipolar. It only serves to solidify the notion that being bipolar defines me.

When I began this blog, my subtitle for my blog, depression introspection, was “a born-again Christian female ponders whether she is her diagnosis or whether her diagnosis is part of her.” I wrote back in February 2007 about how people are not their diagnoses. I no longer subscribe to the idea that I am bipolar but that I, rather, suffer from bipolar disorder. I beg to differ that we are not our diagnoses and I will do everything I can to remind myself that Marissa does not equal bipolar disorder. I am so much more than my diagnosis. As I said on my “Who I Am” page in the More About Me section:

This blog has helped me to recognize many of the things that I am.
That
I truly am more than my diagnosis and that my diagnosis does not define
me. I am not just a person with manic and depressive episodes. I am a
person with a personality….
This is my journey to learn more about myself, my diagnosis, my medical
treatment, and anything relating to my personal life and general mental
health.

Not only that, but as a Bible-believing Christian, I’m learning that my identity needs to be grounded more in God and what He thinks of me rather than what I think of myself.

Clarification on Mobile, Alabama high school suicide

Prester John left this comment:

"an 18-year-old high school student in Mobile, Alabama walked into a high school gym and shot himself in front of classmates on Thursday" The kid had some problems. He’d been suspended from school the day before, but they won’t say why. He had been arrested recently for his part in three armed robberies. (Incidentally, one of his accomplices is the son of a prominent local judge.) He was also homeless, which may very well explain the robberies. (Maybe even the other kid’s part in them. Helping out his bud, so to speak. Kids are so dumb, or at least I was.) Anyway, it’s a terrible tragedy. I’m not sure what it says about this town, state, and country that an 18 year old kid can be homeless but I am sure it’s not good.

The circumstances surrounding this suicide have just made me sadder.

Comment on "The Black Dog" Series

In one of my rare (unbacklogged) posts this week, I’m posting a comment from my mother-in-law and father-in-law mostly about Bob’s depression. Read below:

We love, support and encourage Bob and Marissa in every way that we can think of or are asked of. We wish that we had known more of what Bob was going through in his childhood and in his school and college years but he kept it very well hidden. We as parents maybe should have seen through some of what was going on but Bob tells us now that he became a master at keeping it hidden and we are not to blame for not realizing. That doesn’t make it any easier as parents to accept that we were oblivious to our own child’s needs but it is something that we are working on changing and accepting so that we can NOW be there for them, to do all that we can NOW to give them all the backup, encouragement, support and love that we can. There is nothing in this world that we wouldn’t do for our children (including our loving daughter-in-laws). We want the best for them and for their lives, we wish them contentment, stability, happiness, love, an understanding of each other and a willingness to forgive and forget – that they would turn to each other and us but most of all God in times of need. We pray that they will let us “in” and find a need for us as much as we need them. We hope that they can remember to pick their battles – to not sweat the petty stuff, to give and forgive freely and openly to each other and others. Bob and Marrissa mean the world to Dad and I, there is nothing that they can’t tell us, show us, do, think, or act on that would make us turn away from them – we just love them!

Family support is not just a bonus; it’s a real necessity.