Loose Screws Mental Health News

According to an article in USA Today, researchers have found that siblings who argue could have negative effects on their mental health.

Researchers report that conflicts about personal space and property, such as borrowing items without asking and hanging around when older siblings have friends over, are associated with increased anxiety and lower self-esteem in teens a year later. And fights over issues of fairness and equality, such as whose turn it is to do chores, are associated with later depression in teens.

I’d like to tell these siblings to get over it, but I don’t have any siblings of my own to relate my experience to.


PBS’s Frontline reports that most soldiers who commit suicide have never seen combat or even been deployed. According to the Defense Department, the Army has the sharpest rate of suicides of all the military branches. About 53 percent of military personnel who took their lives in 2011 had no history of deployment to active combat zones such as Iraq or Afghanistan. Even more troubling is that 85 percent of those who committed suicide may have been deployed but not involved in direct combat. Even though the military has invested $50 million to study mental health and suicide, a stigma of getting help still remains. It seems as though military personnel would rather take their own lives than seek help.


An antidepressant called GLYX-13, currently under study, appears to work within hours and last for up to a week. The lead researcher reports little to no side effects on the drug, which is injected intravenously. The drug is in phase 2, which means that its effectiveness and safety are still being tested. I have my doubts about an intravenous drug. If doctors are not currently testing patients’ serotonin levels, how would they be able to prescribe an intravenous antidepressant?


Depression has passed asthma as the top disability among North American (U.S. and Canadian) teens.

Asthma had been the largest contributor to YLDs (years lived with disabilities) for youths in that age range in the US and Canada in 1990, but the study published in The Lancet on Thursday led by researchers at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington, Seattle showed that in this group depression surpassed asthma to claim the number one spot in 2010.

Back in the 1990s, depression was not widely regarded or evaluated among teens. It was still “suck it up” and “pull yourself up by your bootstraps.” My depression was viewed as laziness or “senioritis” among my teachers. I had no sympathy and very little leeway. Now, mental health is being taken more seriously for teens, and I think that’s a good thing.


See you if you can keep an elder person in mind during this holiday season. Senior depression is always on the rise during the holiday season due to problems with health, loneliness, or finances.

Mental Health Problems Among Soldiers and Veterans

I stumbled upon rawstory.com where I read about a report that CBS released detailing that suicide among veterans is double that of non-veterans. The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) estimates that 5,000 veterans will commit suicide this year. Actually, the wording verbatim is "5000 suicides among veterans can be expected this year. It's sad that we've come to the point where we expect veterans to just kill themselves.

The Red State blog highlighted a notable quote from the story:

It found that veterans were more than twice as likely to commit suicide in 2005 than non-vets. (Veterans committed suicide at the rate of between 18.7 to 20.8 per 100,000, compared to other Americans, who did so at the rate of 8.9 per 100,000.)

One age group stood out. Veterans aged 20 through 24, those who have served during the war on terror. They had the highest suicide rate among all veterans, estimated between two and four times higher than civilians the same age. (The suicide rate for non-veterans is 8.3 per 100,000, while the rate for veterans was found to be between 22.9 and 31.9 per 100,000.)
I'll reiterate the obvious that everyone's been stating: Something needs to be done.
In general, the rate for veterans needs to significantly decrease, but I find the rate of suicide in the 20-24 age group alarming.
What's the disconnect between that age range as opposed to the other age ranges?
The issue here that needs to be addressed is psychological effects from the war resulting in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
While I'm sure that psychiatric assistance may come into play for some veterans, all veterans should receive counseling and therapy.
We'll see how the VA handles this information going forward.

In a related matter, USA Today published an article, based on an Army study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, detailing how duty in Iraq affects Army and National Guard soldiers.

The mental toll of fighting in Iraq affects 20% of active-duty soldiers and 42% of National Guard troops and reservists, according to an Army study, which also found that most mental health problems didn't surface until months after troops returned home.

Army psychiatrists examined the results of routine health screenings administered to nearly 90,000 soldiers – active-duty, National Guard and reservists – returning from Iraq in 2005 and 2006. They found about 25,000 suffering mental health problems, ranging from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression to substance abuse and family conflict, according to the study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study also found that mental health problems did not surface as the soldiers left Iraq, but rather, that they appeared about three to six months after a tour of duty. Considering that soldiers are no longer in an unfamiliar area where their top concern is their safety, the appearance of mental health issues upon returning to the U.S. should be of no surprise.

One problem uncovered by the study was the Army's difficulty in treating alcohol abuse. Out of nearly 7,000 soldiers who admitted a drinking problem, 29 signed up for rehabilitation services. The authors blamed this on a policy that requires commanders be notified when a soldier enrolls in alcohol-abuse treatment programs.

I cannot provide any suggestions on how to change a tradition of pretentiousness in the Army: A solider pretending that nothing is wrong while turmoil rages inside his mind. Soldiers are expected and trained to be strong, to not be afraid, and to face their fears. Many of them when on active duty exemplify that attitude. However, working as a soldier is just that – it's work. Just like accountants or editors who are trained in their field, soldiers are trained in their jobs. When a soldier returns from duty, he is a normal human being like the accountant that clocks out at 5 in the evening. Perhaps that analogy might explain how a  soldier struggles with these problems when he is "off the clock," so to speak.

The emergence of mental health issues among soldiers – not just PTSD but also forms of abuse: drug, alcohol, violent – shows that the military needs to engage in preemptive action to combat these problems before they arise. (The puns were not intended, but I thought they were somewhat clever.)

Loose Screws Mental Health News

According to a press release (I’m well aware what I’m saying), a recent study possibly shows that schizophrenia’s physical effects are more widespread in the body; researchers previously theorized that schizophrenia was limited to the central nervous system.

“The findings could lead to better diagnostic testing for the disease and could help explain why those afflicted with it are more prone to type II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and other chronic health problems.”

Apparently, those who suffer from schizophrenia have abnormal proteins in the liver and red blood cells. While schizophrenia’s most visible effects are psychological, researchers have noted that schizophrenics are at a higher risk for “chronic diseases.” The genetic and physical implications of such a study could prove interesting, especially for those suffering from and at risk for schizophrenia. Also in schizophrenia news, researchers have noticed an “excessive startle response.” The startle response, known as prepulse inhibition (PPI), is being considered as a biomarker for the illness.

Something Furious Seasons might like to argue if he hasn’t taken the following on:

“Lastly, but quite importantly, atypical antipsychotic were found to be more effective than typical antipsychotics in improving PPI, thus ‘normalizing’ the startle response. This led the authors to note:

‘Because an overwhelming number of patients with schizophrenia are currently treated with atypical APs, it is possible that PPI deficits in this population are a vanishing biomarker.”

What’s the advantage with atypicals vs. typicals? How do they work differently? *sigh* I need a pharmaceutical-specific wikipedia.

Schizophrenia News previously wrote about how proof is lacking in schizophrenia developing in those who have suffered from child abuse. (Excuse me for the awful construction of that sentence.) However, a new study shows that those at a high risk for schizophrenia benefit from having a good relationship with their parents during childhood. Read more.

Editor and Publisher has noted that suicides among Army soldiers doubled in 2005 compared to 2004.

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