Loose Screws Mental Health News

The mastermind behind Stavzor is Noven Pharmaceuticals (in conjunction with Banner Pharmacaps Inc.). The new “small, easy-to-swallow soft gel capsule” is available in three strengths: 125, 250, and 500 mgs. The pills are are “up to 40% smaller than han Depakote® and Depakote ER® tablets at the 500 mg dosage strength.” From Noven’s PR:

Stavzor is approved for the treatment of manic episodes associated with bipolar disorder, as monotherapy and adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with complex partial seizures that occur either in isolation or in association with other types of seizures, and for prophylaxis of migraine headaches.

The drug will hit the market in mid to late August.

The hotline receives an average 250 calls each day from veterans that have fought in Iraq, Vietnam, and Afghanistan.

The issue of soldiers with mental illness has recently come to light with studies showing that 1 in 5 soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan have shown symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. The issue of the high suicides rate has been a high priority of the VA since mental health director Ira Katz tried to hide the significant number of suicides committed by veterans.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours a day by calling 800-273-TALK (8255); veterans should press “1” after being connected.

“We have seen a 60 per cent increase in demand for our child anxiety classes in the past six months,” said [Dr. Kimberley O’Brien, of the Quirky Kids Clinic at Woollahra in Sydney].

It sounds more like the article is speaking of children who are exposed to constant physical and emotional abuse. If that’s the case, shouldn’t there rather be an increase in parenting properly classes?

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Former Fox News employee suffers from PTSD as a result of bedbugs in the office

This story is sort of sad and wacky at the same time:

A Fox News employee who says she suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder after being bitten by bedbugs at work filed a lawsuit on Thursday against the owner of the Manhattan office tower where she worked.

Jane Clark, 37, a 12-year veteran of Fox News, a unit of News Corp, said she complained to human resources after being bitten three times between October 2007 and April 2008. She said she was ridiculed and the office was not treated for months.

When I first saw that, I thought to myself, give me a break. Then I read:

Clark says she suffers nightmares and keeps a flashlight at her bedside so she can check for bugs during the night.

Suddenly, sympathy hit me. I’m incredibly scared of bugs in general so the thought of bedbugs crawling around in an office and then bringing it home would scare me like crazy. I had enough of a brief PTSD stint after some guy crept into my psych hospital room and began masturbating while he thought I was asleep. Thank God he didn’t rape me.

After coming home from the hospital, I couldn’t sleep with the lights off. My husband, who doesn’t sleep well with the light on, was kind enough to let me leave them on for about a week or so while I slowly got over the whole ordeal. But it took about a month or two before I could get up in the middle of the night by myself before I was convinced that a dark figure making grunting noises wouldn’t be standing next to my side of the bed or lurking in the bathroom or dark hallways of the apartment. For a few weeks, I made my husband escort me to the restroom — I was that scared.

So instead of my initial reaction of rolling my eyes to this story, my heart goes out to Ms. Clark. I always do a spot check of beds anytime I stay at a hotel. I can’t imagine the thought of bringing them home. I get freaked out enough as it is when I find one spider or stinkbug in the apartment.

I’d sleep with the lights on all over again.

Loose Screws Mental Health News

ABC News covers the potential legal wrangling that might occur for Internet users as a result of the MySpace suicide case. I mentioned this in a recent post.

In some sad news after this Memorial Day weekend, Greg Mitchell at the Daily Kos reports that Chad Oligschlaeger, a 21-year-old Marine suffering from PTSD, committed suicide. According to family members, he was taking 8 different kinds of medication to control the disorder. Mitchell has an update on the story.

In some (somewhat) good news, mental health specialists from across the board are offering free services to current troops in an effort to help out with the shortage of mental health assistance in the military.

My Chemical RomanceAlso in a recent post, I also mentioned how people (namely in the UK) have been in an uproar over the fact that some people are equating “emo” music with the glorification of suicide, cutting, and death. My Chemical Romance (MCR), the band seen at the forefront of the emo music scene, has released a statement concerning the uproar and 13-year-old Hannah Bond’s death:

We have recently learned of the suicide and tragic loss of Hannah Bond. We’d like to send our condolences to her family during this time of mourning. Our hearts and thoughts are with them.

My Chemical Romance are and always have been vocally anti-violence and anti-suicide. As a band, we have always made it one of our missions through our actions to provide comfort, support, and solace to our fans. The message and theme of our album “The Black Parade” is hope and courage. Our lyrics are about finding the strength to keep living through pain and hard times. The last song on our album states: “I am not afraid to keep on living” – a sentiment that embodies the band’s position on hardships we all face as human beings. If you or anyone that you know have feelings of depression or suicide, we urge you to find your way and your voice to deal with these feelings positively.

I blame MCR for Hannah’s death about as much as I blame Nirvana and “grunge” music for making me suicidal. (I don’t blame Mr. Cobain at all.) Granted, Nirvana’s music put me in a mental state where I was much more open to depression but I can’t blame a band for my actions. Besides, every generation has the band that every parent feels the need to hate. Nirvana and “grunge” music were “it” for the 90s. MCR and “emo” will soon be out for the 00s. We’ll see what the next band and music genre will influence teenagers in the next decade.

Loose Screws Mental Health News

The AP has reported that a new Army mental health study says soldiers in Afghanistan have been suffering from an increase in depression in correlation with an increase in violence. It’s interesting that the focus is turning to Afghanistan now that violence has decreased in Iraq.

“The annual battlefield study found once again that soldiers on their third and fourth tours of duty had sharply greater rates of mental health problems than those on their first or second deployments, according to several officials familiar with the report.”

It seems that the more soldiers are exposed to combat, the higher the risk of depression and other mental health illnesses. A 2004 study indicates that about one in 10 soldiers have a serious mental health illlness that requires treatment. The AP article mainly focuses on depression but also mentions the rates of anxiety and PTSD are similar to the rates found in soldiers in Iraq last year. Thankfully, the number of troops who sought treatment has decreased to 29 percent from 34 percent in 2006.


TwinsOn a happy note (pun intended), a study published in Psychological Science has discovered that happiness can be genetic. Researchers studied about 1,000 identical and fraternal twins and found that their genes control about half of the traits that make people happy. The other half is control by circumstances.

“People who are sociable, active, stable, hardworking and conscientious tend to be happier, the researchers reported in the journal Psychological Science.

People with positive inherited personality traits may, in effect, also have a reserve of happiness to draw on in stressful times, [Tim Bates, a researcher at the University of Edinburgh who led the study] said.

“An important implication is that personality traits of being outgoing, calm and reliable provide a resource, we called it ‘affective reserve,’ that drives future happiness” Bates said.”

Basically, if you have none of those traits, you’ll just have to suffer through unhappiness like the rest of us. [sarcasm]


Finally, for those of you married men out there, here’s a tip to be a happier husband: Do more around the house, get more sex. ‘Nuff said.

(Image from Jupiter Images)

Mental Health Problems Among Soldiers and Veterans

I stumbled upon rawstory.com where I read about a report that CBS released detailing that suicide among veterans is double that of non-veterans. The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) estimates that 5,000 veterans will commit suicide this year. Actually, the wording verbatim is "5000 suicides among veterans can be expected this year. It's sad that we've come to the point where we expect veterans to just kill themselves.

The Red State blog highlighted a notable quote from the story:

It found that veterans were more than twice as likely to commit suicide in 2005 than non-vets. (Veterans committed suicide at the rate of between 18.7 to 20.8 per 100,000, compared to other Americans, who did so at the rate of 8.9 per 100,000.)

One age group stood out. Veterans aged 20 through 24, those who have served during the war on terror. They had the highest suicide rate among all veterans, estimated between two and four times higher than civilians the same age. (The suicide rate for non-veterans is 8.3 per 100,000, while the rate for veterans was found to be between 22.9 and 31.9 per 100,000.)
I'll reiterate the obvious that everyone's been stating: Something needs to be done.
In general, the rate for veterans needs to significantly decrease, but I find the rate of suicide in the 20-24 age group alarming.
What's the disconnect between that age range as opposed to the other age ranges?
The issue here that needs to be addressed is psychological effects from the war resulting in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
While I'm sure that psychiatric assistance may come into play for some veterans, all veterans should receive counseling and therapy.
We'll see how the VA handles this information going forward.

In a related matter, USA Today published an article, based on an Army study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, detailing how duty in Iraq affects Army and National Guard soldiers.

The mental toll of fighting in Iraq affects 20% of active-duty soldiers and 42% of National Guard troops and reservists, according to an Army study, which also found that most mental health problems didn't surface until months after troops returned home.

Army psychiatrists examined the results of routine health screenings administered to nearly 90,000 soldiers – active-duty, National Guard and reservists – returning from Iraq in 2005 and 2006. They found about 25,000 suffering mental health problems, ranging from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression to substance abuse and family conflict, according to the study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study also found that mental health problems did not surface as the soldiers left Iraq, but rather, that they appeared about three to six months after a tour of duty. Considering that soldiers are no longer in an unfamiliar area where their top concern is their safety, the appearance of mental health issues upon returning to the U.S. should be of no surprise.

One problem uncovered by the study was the Army's difficulty in treating alcohol abuse. Out of nearly 7,000 soldiers who admitted a drinking problem, 29 signed up for rehabilitation services. The authors blamed this on a policy that requires commanders be notified when a soldier enrolls in alcohol-abuse treatment programs.

I cannot provide any suggestions on how to change a tradition of pretentiousness in the Army: A solider pretending that nothing is wrong while turmoil rages inside his mind. Soldiers are expected and trained to be strong, to not be afraid, and to face their fears. Many of them when on active duty exemplify that attitude. However, working as a soldier is just that – it's work. Just like accountants or editors who are trained in their field, soldiers are trained in their jobs. When a soldier returns from duty, he is a normal human being like the accountant that clocks out at 5 in the evening. Perhaps that analogy might explain how a  soldier struggles with these problems when he is "off the clock," so to speak.

The emergence of mental health issues among soldiers – not just PTSD but also forms of abuse: drug, alcohol, violent – shows that the military needs to engage in preemptive action to combat these problems before they arise. (The puns were not intended, but I thought they were somewhat clever.)

Blog worth checking out

Holly Finch’s blog “Am I Still Me?” is worth taking a look at. She was a survivor in the London bombing that occurred on July 7, 2005 and as a result, blogs about her daily life while suffering from PTSD.

She recently blogged about coming off citalopram (U.S. trademark name: Celexa) and is experiencing some awful withdrawal effects. This makes me glad that I skipped Celexa in the hospital before I met my doctor. He recommended Effexor instead.

Not that it makes a difference really. I just had the privilege of not having two withdrawal symptoms in succession.

Loose Screws Mental Health News

Yeah – the copy editor in me wants to try “Loose Screws News.” For now.

Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry is among many of my favorite blogs to read. In this particular post, he rips on Eli Lilly’s zyprexafacts.com, which was set up in response to NYT articles that alleged Lilly drug reps pushed Zyprexa to physicians for off-label uses. I hope to just have a stupid ol’ time and rip on each Eli Lilly press release in response to each NYT article, but we’ll see what happens. I’ve already got one lined up with notes scribbled on the printout; I just need to transfer it into electronic form. (Oh, the joys of being a transit commuter.)

Liz Spikol linked to an article originally published in bp magazine about how difficult marriages are when one spouse suffers from bipolar disorder. The saddest statistic I’ve ever read:

“In the United States and Canada, at least 40 percent of all marriages fail. But the statistics for marriages involving a person who has bipolar disorder are especially sobering—an estimated 90 percent of these end in divorce, according to a November 2003 article, ‘Managing Bipolar Disorder,’ in Psychology Today.”

Um, joy considering that I’m I suffer from bipolar and have been married for just over a year now. This strikes incredible fear in my heart. It’s not that we don’t love and care for each other, but I can only imagine how much a spouse who doesn’t suffer from bipd can take. I hate to say it, but I keep waiting for my husband to walk out on me. Not because I’m pessimistic (OK, I am, but that’s beside the point), but because I fear that he’ll reach a point where he’ll say, “I can’t take anymore of this! I’ve dealt with this for 10 years and nothing’s changed, nothing’s getting better. I’m sorry, but I can’t be married to you and deal with this anymore.” Just waiting.

Kelly Osborne Retarded celebrity story of the day: Kelly Osborne suffers from depression because she’s so privileged. But hey! — she’ll pose for Playboy and get photoshopped so she can feel better. *gags*

If you’re mentally ill and fired for it, don’t bother suing. It looks like the mentally ill don’t have a case unless there’s a physical illness to somehow “prove” it:

“Sixteen years after Congress enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), people with psychiatric disabilities are faring worse in court cases against employers for discrimination than are people with physical disabilities, researchers have found in a national study.

‘People with psychiatric disabilities were less likely to receive a monetary award or job-related benefit, more likely to feel as though they were not treated fairly during the legal proceedings and more likely to believe they received less respect in court,’ said Jeffrey Swanson, Ph.D., a study investigator and an associate professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center.”

I’m not sure how to solve this problem. Psychiatric disabilities are less tangible and harder to prove than a physical disability. It’s easier to wage war against a company if you suffer from a bad back vs. if you suffer from depression. (Whether or not the bad back is a fictional illness is up to you.)

Another oy moment. (The Long Islander in me is coming back full force.) Got a pet that’s misbehaving? Put him or her on an antidepressant. Double oy.

New Zealand is being introduced to lamotrigine (trade name Lamictal in the U.S.). Good luck, bipolar New Zealanders. Best wishes.

And finally, a study has discovered that about half of patients who suffer from some kind of severe burn suffer from clinical depression. (Shouldn’t someone diagnose this as PTSD? That’s pretty traumatic, if you ask me.) While the finding isn’t surprising, the study highlights the need not only to treat the physical ailment, but also to address the mental healing necessary to overcome stress from the injury.

Nerves and New Orleans

I promised myself I wouldn't write entries on the past but I'd already had the following typed up and I can't just let it sit and rot:

I haven’t heard much about it but a device called the vagus nerve stimulator was approved by the FDA in 2005 for “chronic or recurrent treatment-resistant depression and bipolar disorder.” It was previously approved for epilepsy treatment only. The VNS generator is implanted under the skin from the chest to the neck, around the vagus nerve that connects the brain with major organs. VNS is only recommended for people who cannot use medications due to side effects or receive no relief from mental illness.

The New York Times has a stunning piece on Katrina’s latest legacy in New Orleans: unprecedented post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and suicide in the city. The article is a grim reminder that while the world has moved past Katrina, New Orleans has not. I’m sure the same could be said for Mississippi, which gets considerably less attention.