Suicide: Understanding and Intervening – Part II

In 10 years of struggling with suicidal thoughts, I’m practically a “suicidal” expert. (I said "practically," not actually.) I know quite a bit about suicidal ideations and many of the thought processes behind them. Jeffrey Black lists more common features in suicidal thinking:

  • Extreme psychological pain related to unmet psychological needs.
  • A view of self that says she cannot tolerate such intense pain.
  • An overwhelming feeling of hopelessness, and the belief that she is helpless to solve problems.
  • A sense of isolation or desertion accompanied by the belief that others cannot, should not, or do not want to offer support, nurture, or care.

Not all suicides are planned. I, for one, can attest to the fact that they can be impulsive. The combination of elements that Black identifies can seem to lead someone to a suicide attempt. Black’s pattern of identifying someone who possibly could have suicidal tendencies is as follows:

  • Sense of hopelessness
  • Pattern of poor coping skills
  • Limited tolerance for pain
  • Need to flee from help

All four are likely to be present to classify someone as suicidal. Two out of four does not a suicidal person make. Desperate, yes, but not undeniably suicidal.

“Hopelessness can be both a source of psychological pain and a result. A person’s belief in her inability to change things is probably bound up with her experience that the pain is intolerable.

Here’s the equation for a suicidal mind, here is the equation:

problems + inability to change problems = intolerable pain.

If the equation becomes problem + inability to change problems + intolerable pain, then the only solution – as perceived – is suicide. Black breaks down the facets of suicide:

  • The result of a continuous transaction between a person’s heart
  • The symptoms of depression
  • The kinds of stressors in the person’s environment
  • The strategies a person uses to cope with depression and other life events

A person turns to suicide if he is suffering from severe depression; has poor coping strategies; feels that his stressors are too much to handle; and in his heart, has decided that as a result of these circumstances and feelings, he must end his life.

1 Comment

  1. October 21, 2007 at 1:03 pm

    A person turns to suicide if he is suffering from severe depression or atypical depression (which is almost the same)


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